Story

Robin Hood begins when wealthy and aristocratic Robin of Loxley (Taron Egerton) is sent to the crusades. He’s forced to trade riches, comfort and his love, Marion (Eve Hewson), for death and violence in far-off lands. During a mission Robin defies his commander by setting free an enslaved Moor, John (Jamie Foxx), whose son has been beheaded in front of him. As punishment, the commander wounds Robin with an arrow before sending him home to England.

When he gets home, Robin finds that his town is under the tyrannical leadership of the Sheriff of Nottingham (Ben Mendelsohn). The Sherriff has seized Robin’s home to pay war tax, and Marion has moved on to a new love, Will (Jamie Dornan). Before Robin falls into despair, John appears and reveals that he has followed Robin back to England to help him restore order in Nottingham. The two men train together before setting out on a series of daring adventures, in which they steal from the Sheriff and deliver the spoils to the villagers.

As the Sheriff tries to capture the hooded vigilantes, Robin and Marion uncover a secret plot by religious leaders to ensure that the crusades continue so they can remain rich. Robin and his companions must foil the plot before the villagers and Nottingham are completely wiped out.

Themes

Justice; responsibility; death; crime; love

Violence

Robin Hood has continual violence. Here are some examples:

  • The crusade battle scenes are intense, full of violence and death, and have some similarities to modern warfare.
  • During the crusade scenes, there are close-up, hand-to-hand combat sequences.
  • During the crusade scenes, people are beheaded off screen, but the executions are discussed.
  • There are numerous scenes in which people are shot and killed with bows and arrows.
  • John’s hand is cut off with a knife. He later cauterises a metal covering onto the stump.
  • People are stabbed and killed with knives.
  • Characters are flogged.
  • A soldier punches Marion in the face.
  • John kills a guard by strangling him with chains.
  • Villagers make burning bombs, which they throw at guards during a riot.
  • Will falls into fire and severely burns one side of his face.
  • John hangs the Sheriff by his neck in the church, and the Sherriff dies.

Sexual references

None of concern

Alcohol, drugs and other substances

Robin Hood shows some use of substances. For example:

  • Robin drinks heavily when he returns from the crusades.
  • Characters drinks in party settings.
  • Religious figures drink during meetings.

Nudity and sexual activity

Robin Hood has some partial nudity and sexual activity. For example:

  • Marion’s dresses tend to be quite low cut, showing a lot of cleavage.
  • Robin and Marion kiss intimately and for a long time.

Product placement

None of concern

Coarse language

Robin Hood has some coarse language.

Ideas to discuss with your children

Robin Hood is a violent, amped-up, action-filled version of the classic story, with some modern references. Although some viewers might enjoy the action sequences, the dialogue and plot seem clumsy, and the costuming and set design are historically inaccurate so the movie lacks coherence.

Because of its continual violence, as well as its disturbing scenes and themes, this version of Robin Hood isn’t recommended for children under 13 years. Also, we recommend parental guidance for children under 15 years.

Values in this movie that you could reinforce with your children include:

  • fighting for people less fortunate than yourself
  • doing the right thing, even when powerful people oppose you.

You could talk with your children about real-life issues like the rights and wrongs of stealing from the rich to give to the poor, as well as gambling. It’s also important to talk about the way Robin Hood presents men and women. The movie shows many sexist interactions between men and women, as well as men using sexist language to put other men down for not being ‘manly’ enough. In one example, some male soldiers are visibly scared during a crusade scene. A character says, ‘Look alive, ladies’.