Story

Pan is the story of how Peter Pan (Levi Miller) comes to live in Neverland. Peter grows up in an orphanage in London. One day Blackbeard’s (Hugh Jackman) pirates kidnap Peter and the orphan boys and take them to Neverland. While he is held captive by Blackbeard, Peter becomes friends with James Hook (Garrett Hedlund). Together Hook and Peter escape Blackbeard and travel to see the people of Neverland. The warrior Tiger Lily (Rooney Mara) tells Peter about a prophecy that says that one day her people will defeat Blackbeard with the help of a boy who can fly. Peter must learn to believe in himself to save Neverland and fulfil his destiny.

Themes

Loss of a parent; children as victims; pirates

Violence

Pan has some violence. For example:

  • Fighter planes bomb London. The scenes don’t show explosions, but they do include the sounds of bombs and explosions.
  • A nun in the orphanage punishes Peter by hitting him with a cane.
  • Fighter planes try to shoot down the flying pirate ship while Peter is on board. Peter almost falls out of the boat but is saved at the last minute.
  • There is an ongoing war between the pirates and the natives of Neverland. Throughout the movie they fight with swords, guns and cannons. But none of the fight scenes show blood and gore.
  • Tiger Lily slaps Hook.
  • Blackbeard kills the leader of the Neverland natives.
  • Blackbeard burns fairies with fire, but the fairies eventually throw Blackbeard overboard to his death.

Content that may disturb children

Under 8
In addition to the violent scenes mentioned above, Pan has some scenes that could scare or disturb children under eight years. For example:

  • The movie starts in London during World War II. The streets are dark and foggy, and fighter planes are dropping bombs on London. The sounds of the bombing might frighten young children.
  • Peter’s mother is very sad when she leaves him at the orphanage as a baby. This might distress young viewers.
  • Some of the nuns at the orphanage are mean and scary
  • Pirates come in the middle of the night to kidnap the boys from the orphanage. Some of the pirates are scary. One wears white face paint and looks menacing.
  • Some of the fighting scenes between the pirates and the Neverland natives might frighten young children. Occasionally Peter or one of the other main characters look as if they are about to fall or die, but they’re always safe in the end.
  • Blackbeard is scary and might frighten young children.
  • Blackbeard forces the children to work in the mines. These scenes might distress young children.
  • Hook and Peter fly in a pirate ship, which crashes into the forest. This scene is a bit frightening.
  • When Tiger Lily, Hook and Peter are sailing down a river, some giant crocodiles attack. This scene is a bit scary because a crocodile almost kills Peter, but the mermaids save him.
  • Several times the natives or the fairies show Peter a dream-like sequence of the past. These dream sequences might frighten young children.
  • Hook falls off the boat and plummets to the ground. It looks like he’s dead, but Peter saves him at the last minute.
  • Peter feels very sad when he remembers his mother. This might distress young children.

From 8-13
Some younger children in this age group might also be scared or disturbed by the scenes mentioned above.

Over 13
Nothing of concern

Sexual references

Pan has some sexual references. For example:

  • Hook occasionally flirts with Tiger Lily.
  • The fairies show Pan a dream sequence where he learns that his father turned human for one night to save Pan’s mother, and Pan was the child of their love.

Alcohol, drugs and other substances

Pan shows some use of substances, including when Blackbeard breathes in fairy dust to stay young.

Nudity and sexual activity

None of concern

Product placement

None of concern

Coarse language

None of concern

Ideas to discuss with your children

Pan is an exciting action movie that tells the magical story of how Peter Pan came to Neverland. The movie is about the importance of believing in yourself and standing up for your beliefs. It also emphasises the importance of family and of having a place to call home. It’s ideal for children over 10 years.

We don’t recommend Pan for children under 7 years, and we do recommend parental guidance for children aged 7-10 years. This is because of the movie’s violence, and its scary and distressing scenes.

Values in Pan that you could reinforce with your children include bravery and kindness. This movie could also give you the chance to talk with your children about whether violence is the right way to solve problems.