Story

God’s Not Dead 2 is a sequel to God’s Not Dead and has some of the same characters. It takes place in a US public high school. A student asks history teacher Grace Wesley (Melissa Joan Hart) a question about Martin Luther King’s non-violent approach during the civil rights movement. Grace responds by quoting Jesus’s admonition to ‘Love your enemies, and pray for those who persecute you’.

The reaction is extreme. Someone complains that Grace is ‘preaching in class’, and many at the school argue that she has broken the rules about what’s allowed to be taught in schools. The school board and American Civil Liberties Union both get involved, but Grace refuses to apologise for her statement. She maintains that she was not preaching but quoting and that she did nothing wrong.

The matter goes to court. Grace is represented by a kind lawyer named Tom Endler (Jesse Metcalfe), who is willing to take a chance on her and admires her resolution. The prosecution is led by the chief attorney from the American Civil Liberty Union, Peter Kane (Ray Wise). As the court case progresses, the movie’s focus shifts from whether Grace made a wrong decision to whether Grace and Tom can prove that Jesus was a historical figure.

Themes

Religion; the law; relationships; staying true to one’s beliefs

Violence

God’s Not Dead 2 has some limited violence. For example:

  • Characters have heated arguments, mainly about religious differences.
  • A father smacks his son across the face during a verbal argument.
  • Protestors shout angrily outside a courthouse, holding signs of protest.

Content that may disturb children

Under 8
Children in this age group might be scared by some of the scenes mentioned above.

From 8-13
Nothing of concern

Over 13
Nothing of concern

Sexual references

None of concern

Alcohol, drugs and other substances

None of concern

Nudity and sexual activity

Nothing of concern

Product placement

None of concern

Coarse language

None of concern

Ideas to discuss with your children

God’s Not Dead 2 focuses primarily on a struggle between individuals and public institutions.

When Grace’s job is threatened and she’s told that she must apologise for including religion in class, she remains steadfast in her beliefs. She’s presented as an inspired, motivated woman who won’t buckle under the pressure. In standing up for what she believes in the face of extreme opposition, she inspires others to stand beside her. In this way, the movie highlights the importance of friendships and supportive relationships in challenging situations.

The movie also presents a critical perspective on religion’s place in a public education system and emphasises vastly different perspectives on the matter.

The movie’s themes and scenes of heated argument make it more suitable for older children, so we don’t recommend it for viewers under 13 years.