Story

Bill Koala (voice of Richard Roxburgh) is the greatest explorer in the Australian outback. When he goes missing, his son Blinky Bill (voice of Ryan Kwanten) braves the outback to search for his father. On his journey Blinky meets a zoo koala named Nutsy (voice of Robin McLeavy) and a frill-necked lizard named Jacko (voice of David Wenham). Together the three friends must face scary Croc Canyon if they want to find Blinky’s father and go home.

Themes

Death of a parent; separation from a parent; children as victims

Violence

Blinky Bill: The Movie has some violence. For example:

  • A scary cat keeps trying to attack and eat Blinky and his friends. Several times the cat corners Blinky and almost kills him, but Blinky always gets away. 
  • Nutsy occasionally punches or kicks Blinky when they get lost.
  • The cat attacks a wombat, and it looks like the wombat is dead. Later it turns out that he’s OK. 
  • The crocodiles in Croc Canyon try to eat Blinky and his friends. They just manage to escape safely. 
  • The scary cat is eaten by a crocodile.

Content that may disturb children

Under 5
In addition to the violent scenes mentioned above, Blinky Bill: The Movie has some scenes that could scare or disturb children under five years. For example:

  • One of the characters warns Blinky that he might ‘smash his brains open’ if his kite breaks. 
  • A falling rock almost squashes one of the characters. For a moment everyone thinks that she’s dead, but they quickly realise that she’s OK.  
  • In an emotional scene for children, Blinky’s mum says that she has given up on his father ever coming home. Blinky gets very upset and runs to his room.
  • On his journey, Blinky meets some dangerous wild animals and goes through spooky dark forests.
  • Blinky finds a dead lizard on the road and then almost gets run over by a truck himself. 
  • Blinky and his friends start hallucinating from heat exhaustion in the desert. This might frighten young children.  
  • Nutsy says that both of her parents died in a bushfire. This might upset some children. 
  • The scariest scene is in Croc Canyon. Nutsy is surrounded by scary crocs that chomp at her toes. She almost falls to her death but is saved at the last minute.
  • Blinky finds his dad’s hat and a pile of bones (not shown on screen) and thinks that his dad is dead. Blinky is very sad, and the scene might upset young children. Later in the movie we discover that his father is still alive.  

From 5-8
Children in this age group might also be scared or disturbed by the scenes mentioned above.

From 8-13
Younger children in this group might be scared or disturbed by some of the scenes mentioned above.

Over 13
Nothing of concern

Sexual references

Blinky Bill: The Movie has mild sexual references. For example, Jacko flirts with one of the emus.

Alcohol, drugs and other substances

None of concern

Nudity and sexual activity

None of concern

Product placement

The following products are displayed or used in Blinky Bill: The Movie: Blinky Bill franchise and associated merchandise.

Coarse language

There is some mild coarse language that children might copy in Blinky Bill: The Movie.

Ideas to discuss with your children

Blinky Bill: The Movie is an enjoyable adventure movie full of Australian slang and Australian animals. 

We don’t recommend this movie for children under 6 years, and we recommend parental guidance for children aged 6-9 years. This is because of the movie’s themes and its scary and violent scenes. It’s worth noting that Blinky Bill: The Movie was originally classified PG by the Australian Classification Board and reclassified G by the Classification Review Board after an appeal by the distributor.

The main message from this movie is that ‘an adventurer never gives up, always helps those in need and always keeps his promises’.

Values in this movie that you could reinforce with your children include kindness, acceptance of others, bravery and perseverance.

This movie could also give you the chance to talk with your children about the pros and cons of keeping animals in zoos and wildlife centres.