Story

Cory (Sofia Wylie) is an ultra-brainy American school girl who’s about to go on a three-month scientific boat trip with the Harold Science Academy in Sydney. But she accidentally gets on the wrong bus and finds herself on the way to the Harold Soccer Academy instead.

Against her nature, Cory must navigate a complex world of friendship, soccer and boys. And she has to do this without getting in the way of the Academy’s queen bee, Edie (Tiarnie Coupland). When Edie’s best friend Oliver (Trae Robin) takes a liking to Cory, Edie decides to bring the new girl down.

With Edie’s wrath and the future of the soccer team hanging over them, Cory and her friends Janessa (Gemma Chuan-Tran), Adelle (Yasmin Honeychurch) and Charlotte (Ashleigh Ross) must work together to beat Edie at her own game. At the same time, they have to prove they have what it takes to stay at the Academy.

Themes

Friendship; bullying; parental love and neglect

Violence

Back of the Net has some violence. For example, a teenage girl pushes another girl into the ground. She offers her hand to help her up, but removes it again, making the girl fall back into the ground. No-one is hurt.

Sexual references

Back of the Net has some mild romantic references. For example, there is romantic tension between Oliver and Cory throughout the movie, but this doesn’t progress to anything sexual.

Alcohol, drugs and other substances

Nothing of concern

Nudity and sexual activity

Back of the Net shows some nudity and sexual activity. For example:

  • Two teenage boys are shirtless on the beach.
  • Oliver tries to kiss Cory, but she pulls away.
  • Cory pecks Oliver on the cheek.

Product placement

The following products are displayed or used in Back of the Net:

  • Qantas
  • Smartphones – particularly iPhone
  • Apple MacBook
  • Hurley branded shirts
  • Google.

Coarse language

There is some very mild coarse name-calling in Back of the Net – for example, ‘idiot’ and ‘loser’.

Ideas to discuss with your children

Back of the Net is a sweet Australian children’s movie that shows everyone can succeed if they work together.

There are great performances by the young cast, some comic relief from the soccer coach, and strong moral messages about friendship, teamwork and acceptance. This movie will probably entertain children aged 10-13 years, but it’s likely to lack interest for much younger or much older children.

Values in this movie that you could reinforce with your children include:

  • not judging people by appearances, because people are usually more complex than they seem
  • being open to help from your friends when things get difficult
  • achieving success through teamwork and perseverance.

Back of the Net could also give you the chance to talk with your children about real-life issues like the consequences of making a fire on a beach without adult supervision.