Story

Frank Beardsley (Dennis Quaid) works for the US coastguard. He runs his family with the same military precision that he runs his ship. He has eight children who have moved many times throughout their lives. Helen North (Rene Russo) is a creative designer with 10 children – four biological and six adopted. She believes in free expression and runs her family accordingly.

Frank and Helen were high school sweethearts. They meet quite by chance at a restaurant, and pick up where they left off many years ago. They decide to get married soon after.

Their children are less than impressed with their new brothers and sisters. When they all move in together, all-out war starts. Initially the children fight but then decide to unite against the common enemy - their parents. They try to break up the marriage so that things can go back to the way they were. But as all the children work together, they begin to care for and respect each other. Then it becomes a race against time to get their parents back together again.

Themes

Blended families

Violence

There is some slapstick violence in this movie. For example, children throw things at each other and flick paint. 

Content that may disturb children

Under 8

Children in this age group might worry about the idea that one of the parents is absent. They might also worry about one scene where the younger children are all hanging by the legs out of the top of their house (which is, in fact, a lighthouse tower).

Over 8

There is nothing in this movie that would concern children in this age group.

Sexual references

There is one mild reference by the parents about getting some time alone together in their bedroom.

Alcohol, drugs and other substances

There is a wild party towards the end of the movie with some drinking of alcohol.

Nudity and sexual activity

None

Product placement

None

Coarse language

This movie contains some mild coarse language.

Ideas to discuss with your children

Yours, Mine and Ours is a lighthearted comedy about what happens when two very different types of families try to make a home together. It is similar to the Brady Bunch (which is even referenced in the movie). But this family has a different set of challenges. The movie will appeal to older children, teenagers and some adults.

As a story about blended families, it provides a great opportunity to talk about:

  • the challenges and opportunities for people in this situation
  • how appearances can be misleading
  • how when you make the effort to work with others, the results can be surprisingly positive.

You could also talk about some of the values presented  in the movie. These include tolerance, loyalty, teamwork and trust in others. You could also talk about your family values in relation to hitting others and throwing things.