By Australian Council on Children and the Media
Pinterest
Print Email
 
Boy watching movie
 
This movie at a glance Move mouse over icons to see their meaning
Rating
  • Suitable for viewing by general population
Recommendations
  • Not recommended for children under 5
  • Parental guidance for children under 13
  • Suitable for children over 13
Warnings
Genre Teen comedy
Length 97 minutes
Release Date 20/9/2007

Story

This is the story of four girls who have been friends since kindergarten. Sasha (Logan Brown), Jade (Janel Parrish), Yasmin (Nathalia Ramos) and Cloe (Skyler Shae) come from very different backgrounds and have different interests, but their friendship is very important to each of them and they are very loyal towards one another. As the film opens they are about to start high school together at Carry Nation High and are excited by the prospect.

The four friends soon find their friendship severely tested. The powerful school president Meredith Dimly (Chelsea Staub) who is also the principal's daughter, is determined to have complete control of the whole school. When students turn up on the first day she directs students with similar interests into their own groups. This splits the students into cliques and discourages them from mixing socially with each other. Meredith and her friends take advantage of this divisive situation to run the school.

Since each of the four Bratz friends has different skills and interests, Meredith's plan is sucessfull in keeping them apart. They find that they are unable to spend time with each other and two years later hardly talk.

One day they end up in detention together and realise that they have been tricked into compromising their friendship. They form a plan that helps them spend time together and also help the different cliques to get to know each other. This plan makes an enemy of Meredith, forcing the four friends to work hard to be together and follow their dreams.

Here we outline any topics, issues and ideas in this movie that might upset children and adolescents, so that you can gauge whether it is appropriate for your child. For example, children and adolescents may react adversely to themes of crime, suicide, drug and alcohol dependence, death, serious illness, family breakdown, separation from a parent, animal cruelty or distress, children as victims, natural disasters and racism.

High school cliques; peer pressure

Here we identify any violence in this movie, and explain how and why it might impact on your child or adolescent. In general, movie violence can make children less sensitive to the use of violence in real life. Alternatively, they may become fearful about the prevalence and likelihood of violence in their own world. In some contexts, it can also teach them to see violence as an acceptable means of conflict resolution.

There is a fist fight between students in one scene, and a food fight in another scene.

Content that may disturb children

Children are unlikely to be disturbed or scared by anything in this film.

Sexual references

Young girls are described as ‘hot’ and some of the words in the songs are suggestive, although these are difficult to hear.

Alcohol, drugs and other substances

None 

Nudity and sexual activity

This movie contains some nudity and sexual activity. For example, it includes:

  • sexualised dancing
  • clothing that exposes cleavage and midriffs
  • girls wearing bikinis and brief leotards
  • some kissing.

Product placement

The film itself can be seen as a marketing platform for ‘Bratz’ dolls and associated merchandise. Apple iPods feature heavily, as do American shops and clothing brands.

Coarse language

This movie contains some mild coarse language and put-downs.

Ideas to discuss with your children

This teenage comedy is based on characters from Bratz dolls and cartoons. The main theme that emerges in this movie is the value of friendship. You might like to talk about this with your child, as well as the following values:

  • loyalty and faith in friends even when you may not fully understand their reasons for their actions
  • belief in yourself and standing up for your principles in the face of opposition
  • basing success not just on looks but also on behaviour.

You could also talk about the negative consequences of cliques, peer pressure, selfishness and the need to control others.

  • Add to favourites
  • Create pdf
  • Print
  • Email
 
  • Last Reviewed 2007-10-23