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Posted 10/07/2012 7:54:54 PM
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Hi all,

I'm new to this forum and hope that anyone can help me. My son who is almost 4 is currently waiting to be assessment for high functioning autism/aspergers. Some days are better than others which makes me question the whole assessment as it is such a wait.

My son has tantrums if things don't happen his way, he is obsessed with cars and anything to do with cars. Lining them up by size, colour etc. He has trouble with eye contact and wants to be social and tries but before too long he is frustrated and playing on his own. He only toilet trained at 3.5 yrs and has the worst trouble sleeping all night long.

I have one paediatrician say that he has aspergers but was doing his fellowship so his word means nothing in the assessment process.

From what you all know does he sound like he has signs and am I right to go through the assessment? I feel like my son is getting worse as time goes on and that it's harder to calm him down or help him.

Thank you
Post #68161
Posted 11/07/2012 9:45:45 AM


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Kaz44,

From the behaviours that you have mentioned, you are definitely doing the right thing having the assessment. The "wait" is always difficult, especially with children at the high end of the spectrum as they tend to present unevenly - many of their behaviours overlap with normal developmental foibles. My son had an obsession with identifying the makes of cars at your son's age - and he was toilet trained just after four....however, he's come on very well and his diagnosis of autism (high-functioning) is not readily noticeable.

If your son is assessed as having Aspergers, it will be such a help when he begins school, as it will be taken into account if he has any specific difficulties.

Good luck














Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience.
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Post #68174
Posted 13/07/2012 8:58:11 PM
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Hi Harriet,

Thank you for responding. DS's tantrums get worse with each day and some days are better than others which make me question the need for a assessment but I know his car obsession and routines are not something to be ignored.

It's the wait that is killing me. I feel helpless waiting when he needs the help and I'm questioning if he has autism or not daily.

I am driving myself silly really

Post #68217
Posted 14/07/2012 9:36:45 AM
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I remember being so stressed during ax - initially we were just going for iq testing but the psych did a screen and some flags were there. It was still total shock when I got the diagnosis. So many things didnt fit with my idea of spectrum kids but when it was there in black and white that his reciprocity was not good, he had literal interpretation of language, a need for sameness and his expressive language was delayed I realised he sat somewhere there. We ended up with a pddnos diagosis. I know its hard - questioning everything is difficult to stop. I still question our diagnosis now 6 months down the track - its a waste of energy though. What I do know is the funding we got is amazing and we have some absolutely wonderful services happening,thank goodness.
Post #68242
Posted 14/07/2012 8:04:43 PM
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Thank you for telling me your story. It really rings true. My son has most of his trouble with language and expression which causes tantrums. He has trouble being social and is quite hard to keep calm some days.

I want a diagnosis to get that help he needs but the wait, the appointments that we ate waiting lists for whilst we want for an assessment is stressful. You all are so strong to me as I just wish we were at that place of help and the diagnosis is done.

My son starts school in 2014 and I'm hoping to get him assessment by then and in a good place for what he needs to be
Post #68248
Posted 14/07/2012 11:47:34 PM


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Kaz44,

It's not uncommon to be confused and to continually ask yourself if somehow everyone is overreacting.....but......it your son does meet the criteria, even at the high end of the spectrum, he will have a few more hurdles than most children in the school system. It's best that his particular challenges are recognised and strategies put in place to help him.

Really it is difficult when a child seems "up and down" in his or her presentation. My son had practically no language until just after he turned three, but then he had a language explosion and caught up very quickly. He still has a few quirks when speaking however, often getting mixed up and having to start his sentences over again. (he met all four of the language deficit criteria - and yet he speaks quite well). The other thing is his socialisation. He is an extremely friendly boy. However, other children pick up on his naivety and his gullibility. They cannot help but stir him up, and he reacts. This is not the case with all children, but it's common for peers to act in that way. My son gets on very well with younger kids as they don't feel the need to lead him along. We homeschool so he's not exposed to the random slings and arrows at school. He attends a drama class once a week in the afternoons and loves it, gets on well with the other children there and we have family friends with whom he plays. Its a difficult thing with socialisation for the reasons I've pointed out, and all children are different....but, like I said, if your boy meets the criteria, it's best to have strategies.














Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience.
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Post #68249
Posted 16/07/2012 8:43:09 AM
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Harriet,

My son was the same with delayed language then an explosion of words. He is also social but he gets bossy and frustrated at kids after he starts playing with them. What you say definitely helps me see that everything is not just my son "being a kid" and that the signs I've seen are not just me going crazy.

We are on the waiting list for assessment and I think the wait is the hardest part. Watching him get worse in some respects just breaks my heart as I have trouble knowing the best way to help him. I wanted the assessment more for his school years as if he needs help I wanted to be sure I got it.

Post #68255
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