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Bedwetting - 8yr & nearly 10yr old Expand / Collapse
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Posted 22/08/2011 1:41:21 PM
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I have 3 boys, the youngest only occassionally wets at night (almost 6). The oldest is nearly 10 and he is wet every night...and I mean head to toe dripping wet. Middle one just turned 8 and he is often wet at night but not all the time and not as much as the oldest.

I know that many people would automatically advise the use of a bedwetting alarm. My problem is that with two of them one might wake when the other wets (and the youngest would wake too as they all share a room) which isn't going to help anyone.

the other issue is that I am a single mum and for years struggled with sleep, I have been on antidepressents for a year now and am finally able to sleep most nights. I don't think I could actually cope with a bedwetting alarm even for one of them let alone 2 (or 3)!

Surely there is another way to help, It is becoming a major drama for scout camps for them.

jude


Jude
Single Mum to Owen 7 (Aspie), Brett 5 & Corey 3
Post #61361
Posted 22/09/2011 11:11:38 AM
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Hi Jude,

I hear you. Sleep is very precious, particularly when you are parenting alone and need it for your sanity.

The bell and pad can also be used with an attachment that vibrates under the pillow. So if you have children sharing a bedroom, this would be the best option. Your 10 year old can probably be taught to turn the alarm off and sort himself out without needing your assistance (I am assuming that you are getting up at the moment to sort him out). Most children start to improve by 3 weeks, so it is not long-term.

You would only do one child at a time, so you will probably find that once you have done one, the others will be much easier. This treatment is not recommended for children under 7 as often they grow out of it themselves without treatment.

What you do want though, is a good quality bell and pad, and a good therapist to guide you.

Ramsey-coote, the people who manufacture and rent out the equipment can tell you who can provide a service in your area.

Best of luck

Vicparent

Post #62790
Posted 23/09/2011 5:21:58 PM
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My 10 year old also wets much like yours. To be honest we have tried drugs, the alarm, drinites the whole kit and kaboodle and nothing has worked. Maybe limit liquid in take to tea time, no more after that but ensure that he drinks enough during the day. A good practice to help him realise is to get him to be responsible for stripping the bed and putting the load of washing on. This will ease you work and might help trigger something for him. I think the important thing is knowing you aren't alone and it is common still, statistically there would be 1 to 2 children in his class that bed wet and this just lessens as time goes on. I have been told also that sometimes the onset of puberty kicks of the hormone that they need to stop producing so much urine at night...I wait anxiously... If you have had him checked over by the dr and all seems ok, it might just be a matter of letting him grow out of it. Wishing you lots of luck.

Post #62827
Posted 23/01/2012 12:38:56 PM
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You don't mention whether you have seen your doctor. I would suggest that. He/she may be able to get to the bottom of the problem. There are physiotherapists who specialise in this area and can help a lot. A friend has had this problem with her child and it turned out the size of his bladder was that of a very much younger child and so a physio worked with them to try to increase the size of his bladder to help him last through the night.
Post #65941
Posted 7/04/2012 3:53:36 PM
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Hey - I notice that this is from January, however I just wanted to offer my advice. My son wet the bed until he was just over 12.

There were no discovered clinical reasons for this - we did all the no drinks late at night etc etc.

He just grew out of it in his own time. It is incredibly frustrating for you and your sons - but it is not uncommon especially in boys.

When he went for a sleepover I used to have a pullup in the bottom of his sleeping bag so that he could slip it on without anybody knowing just in case of an accident. He would then leave it in the bottom of the bag the next day and I would dispose of it when he came home.

Provided there are no medical reasons for the bedwetting just 'go with the flow' (pardon the pun!) and time will take care of their control.
Post #67202
Posted 11/07/2012 2:59:20 AM
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I felt the same as you about bed wetting alarms.  I could not imagine they would ever wake up my deep sleeper anyway, let alone wake the other 2 children in the process.  We used pulls up everynight sometimes 2 a night.  Never a dry night in 10.5 years.

We live in a very hot climate so we didn't want to limit fluids too much.  We also tried the A2 Milk (avail at Coles) as I had read an article about it relating to bedwetting and Autism.  It was worth a try anyway.  He didn't know we swapped his milk as I didn't want him to be disappointed if it didn't work. Apparently milk stays in your system for a long time so we gave no milk after 5pm, just water.

Our doctor said, take away the Pull Ups as they become reliant on them, and measure input and output water and we then noticed how much water he was drinking late in the day and not drinking much of his water bottle at school,  (Too busy)

We knew it wasn't a bladder size problem as he could go long periods during the day without going. 

So the thing that worked for us: after 10.5 years of never a dry night. Google (Brolley Sheet) on the bed to save on washing, do this during Summer - again less washing, we asked him to only sip water at dinner time, but drink as much water at school as possible to hydrate his body in the heat of the day, we stopped using Pull Ups, woke him at 11pm (before I went to bed) and walked our Thunderbird Zombie to the toilet and woke again at 4ish just for a couple of nights and after 6 months (maybe could have done it earlier but I was avoiding washing) dropped the 11pm one.  Never wet the bed since?  Might be coincidence, might have been just he grew out of it, or he broke a habit and a little success went a long way.  Who knows, just glad its over.

Good luck, hope something there helps.

Post #68171
Posted 30/08/2012 9:58:58 PM
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we are still going and now 9 and nearly 11!

good news is 9yr old down to 1-2 times a week so growing out of it.

My oldest has aspergers and was born with a very bad case of hypospadeis (hole in penis on the underneath side instead of the tip - his penis was bent and tip joined to the base and they had to release it and construct a uretha from the base to the tip of his penis). His surgeon said that between the aspie and the surgery and the fact that his father wet til quite late that it would just take time.

Still does my head in a bit but we just manage it as best we can. Have given thought to the bell and pad alarm but last time doc said it wasn't worth it (single mum 3 kids who kept hopping into each other beds etc etc). Am moving in with my partner soon so will have more support but it still may not be the best for him as he freaks out at loud sudden noises which is another reason to go with the 'wait it out' approach.

praying for less wet sheets soon though. It makes camp difficult for them - they always worried that someone will find out about their drynites! but leaders are great.
Jude


Jude
Single Mum to Owen 7 (Aspie), Brett 5 & Corey 3
Post #69222
Posted 30/08/2012 11:29:31 PM
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Great to hear that things are getting a little easier. 

My youngest was the 1st of 3 to be dry too.  It added another element of why is our 4 yr old brother dry and not us, to the equation.  We just had to explain that everyones bodies works on developing different parts at different times.  His body worked on that first.

Have you looked into Brolly Sheets, they saved me so much washing! I bought 3!  I even use them now for when the kids have tummy bugs/sick and I lay them on the bed or couch when they are sick to save on cleaning everything!  They go in the washing machine/dryer and they are like a cotton/plastic wide strip that tucks in.  Can only buy them online I think, its a New Zealand Company.

Thanks for the update, I often wonder how things are going from posts on here.

Post #69225
Posted 8/10/2012 3:59:58 AM
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I think bed wetting is quite common and kids always grow out of it (ever heard of an adult under 60 wetting the bed?). Make sure they use the loo before bed and don't drink too much in the evening.
Post #69814
Posted 4/06/2013 9:43:41 AM
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Hiya. I can sympathize with you completely. My daughter is 10 and still wets the bed, tho we have it cut down at the moment by sticking to this one simple rule.

My daughter goes to bed at 7.30. She knows 6.00pm is her drink time cut off. From the time she gets home from school up until 6 on the dot she can drink as much as she likes, but 6 is the latest she can consume liquids. That gives her body 1.5 hours to process the liquids she has in her system, therefore leaving nothing that can come out during sleep. I make absolutely sure she drinks enough before then though as you don't want them dehydrated, but it stands to reason that if there is no liquid there, it can't make an unpleasant comeback during the night.

I hope that helps.
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