Print Email
 
Welcome Guest ( Login | Register )
Forums Guide Disclaimer
 
Please help us maintain the quality of these forums by respecting the Terms of Use and by reporting any misuse to the moderator.
 

12»»

could he be gifted? Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted 15/08/2008 1:20:53 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 8/11/2008 9:43:29 PM
Posts: 3, Visits: 7
my 2 1/2 year old son is extremely clever, im not blowing my own trumpet but i have been told by his dare care centre and by others who have worked with children that he might be gifted. im worried about giving him the label and i don't know where to start to help him achieve his best. he is already doing pre school related activities and can talk better than most 5 year olds. i want to stimulate him enough but i also want him to be a 2 year old.

are there any mums out there with 'gifted' kids that could give me some advise.

Post #10970
Posted 15/08/2008 3:45:03 PM
Forum Guru

Forum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum GuruForum Guru

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 9/07/2010 9:11:23 PM
Posts: 70, Visits: 342
Hi,

My 5y.o. is in the same boat. He started to talk @ 6mths was saying 3-4 word sentences by 9-12mths. We had him tested for giftedness by a psychologist when he was 4, at that point there was a suggestion he may have had asperger's. He didn't have asperger's, he was , as we had always thought, highly gifted. It's around $500 to do but I think medicare covers a fair wack if you get a referal from a peadiatrician to the psycologist, it's also covered by private health insurance. Basically all testing does is give you proof for schools etc. that you're not just blowing your own trumpet.

In the mean time try reading

The Survival Guide for parents of gifted kids - Sally Yahnke Walker

or

Young gifted children - Louise Porter

both have definitions and what sort of things equate to giftedness. Basically, achieving milestones one third faster than normal or if not achieved early once achieved progressing quickly to next milestone.

The new rule of thumb is to not advance these kids past their age group but to give them extra curricular work to do.

Good luck, please feel free to message me.

Post #10972
Posted 18/08/2008 1:12:27 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 8/11/2008 9:43:29 PM
Posts: 3, Visits: 7
thanks for your response i will definately give those books a read.
Post #10985
Posted 15/12/2009 11:21:15 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 20/05/2012 8:21:17 AM
Posts: 1, Visits: 6
Hi,

I realise this topic was posted 15 months ago (10 days before my gorgeous boy was born!) but I wanted to add something for all those mums who might read it in the future.

I have just started looking at information for gifted children, because said Toddler seems to be gifted as well, specifically in the speech/words area.

However, I was a gifted child myself. My Mum was great as I had my own playroom (a real luxury!) and she spent a lot of time helping me to be creative at home, and I did extremely well early on at school.

One thing that did happen though, was that I was moved up a year ahead at school. At the time, and until reading the previous post, I did not realise the significance of it. Intellectually I did fine, and managed the work, but emotionally I was still the same age (even though I was often told that I was mature for my age). My ability to cope with my intelligence seemed like it was still at the level of my peers at the same age. In highschool I was always the youngest person in my year. In essence, I had the insight and sensitivity of an older person but I didn't know how to handle it or what to do with it. Looking back I think I had depression as a teenager.

So I completely agree with the concept now, that children be kept with their peers but given extra work instead (by work I mean stimulation of any kind: creativity, study etc). It's interesting as an adult now I still prefer the company of people older than me.

xo
Post #21205
Posted 19/12/2009 10:24:40 AM


Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 30/01/2013 3:36:24 PM
Posts: 536, Visits: 1,207
Please embrace his abilities. Don't hold him back. He can still enjoy things that other 2 year olds do at his own leisure.

I excelled at mathematics at primary school, and ended up going to a special class for 'gifted' children (thanks to my mum). Some of the maths was of a university level! Unfortunately I went to a school that didn't embrace these types of skills and I was pigeon holed to be more ordinary and normal, and my parents could not afford to send me to a better school so needless to say my talents have since been lost. I'm still very good at maths, but haven't really used it to my advantage sadly.

Children are sponges and there is no better time to encourage your child to be at their best. All the luck, I'm really pleased for you
Post #21280
Posted 1/06/2010 1:17:04 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 3/06/2010 2:18:23 PM
Posts: 1, Visits: 3
Hi, reading everyones comments in relation to this topic has been great, but I was wondering if anyone has been down this path - I'm sure someone has.

We were always aware that our son was quite bright, did most things well before others his own age and seems to pick things up so easily.

He is 2.5years and speaks like a 4-5 year old, knows more than 12 colours and shapes on sight, loves to read etc etc.  He is very expressive, cuddly and loves to play.  However we have been advised that he could have a form of autism. 

He does have some little obsessions (I thought that most toddlers were very taken with something, ie. trucks, vacuums etc etc) but apparently this is one of the signs.

We are due to have a formal assessment this week, but I am quite scared now as the information I have read about autistic children does not seem to correspond with my son.

I am worried that if this is the case he will "labelled" and his natural ability to learn will be hindered - I do not want his to be held back due to a perception of a condition, rather than what he actually may have. 

I know I should wait to see how things go at the assessment, but need to try and get some understanding from parents that have been in this situation rather than just advice from a "professional".

Any advice would be greatly appreciated as we want the best for him.

Post #29094
Posted 6/06/2010 7:56:17 PM
Junior Member

Junior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior MemberJunior Member

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 4/08/2010 9:34:48 PM
Posts: 17, Visits: 151
id look into Montessori activities/playgroups etc

(hire a montessori book from the library or look online)

good luck
Post #29432
Posted 6/06/2010 10:26:13 PM


Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 10/05/2013 11:15:34 PM
Posts: 819, Visits: 2,637
Hi jazzylion5510,
Only just spotted your post. you're obviously close to the assessment now, but I wanted to tell you of our experience.
My son had a significant speech delay until just after he turned three - then he took off in that department. He was reading fluently before he turned five - I mean he was reading books designed for seven and eight year-olds. He'd been assessed for ASD at around 2 1/2 - paed decided to wait and see. We went back at the urging of my son's kindy teacher and the paed diagnosed him as gifted. Unfortunately, he was wrong - my son has now been diagnosed as high-functioning autistic. This only came about after a lot of self-education on my part and a push to have a formal assessment from us.
First things first - My son's reading ability was something called hyperlexia, which is a precocious ability to read at an early age, not accompanied by the same level of comprehension, although comprehension is there. My son was quite interested in looking through our local business directory when he was two and finding logos that he recognised. Later he developed an obsession identifying the makes of cars - something that would completely take over whenever we left the house. Now that he is older, he has other special and restricted interests. However, my son, who is now nearly nine, is an intelligent young man who is doing quite well and certainly learning a lot.
Depending on your son's behaviours, the paed will probably be looking at Asperger Syndrome - this is quite similar to high-functioning ASD, except that the child does not have a communication deficit (as my son did initially).
I suppose my main piece of advice is not to worry too much - believe me, if your son does have this sort of developmental issue, he will need the label to help give him the care and understanding that he'll require at school in the future - there is nothing more heartbreaking than hearing of undiagnosed ASD children trying to cope in a classroom with no understanding of their condition. Also, having this condition does not preclude your child from being extremely bright, in fact it is common for ASD children to excel in their areas of interest.
Hope everything goes all right with the assessment - they may decide to wait as your son is so young - in the meantime, learn as much as you can about the condition - as you may need some expertise later on to push your son's agenda.

Cheers














Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience.
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Post #29446
Posted 12/04/2011 10:07:18 AM


Supreme Being

Supreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme BeingSupreme Being

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 15/12/2011 9:20:06 AM
Posts: 93, Visits: 2,592
i dont know if im overreacting... but please i need some imput. my little girl is very similar to jazzylion"s little boy.. she is 21m but has vocab of 4 - 5 yo, knows all her colours and seems to have a great grasp of language, people are always commenting on how great she is at talking for her age... which i have been so proud of, as i thought she got it off me ( im a word girl and although not gifted as such was always v good with language..)but since her dad is slightly asperger's and since reading these threads im so scared and worried that she has inherited it. breaks my heart coz i know from living with my hubby for 5 years now, communication is a constant struggle, we are constantly having fights over misunderstandings which are usually my fault coz in his head everything is "logical and right" all the time and im just the one who is stubborn and selfish and wont listen... until i talk to someone normal and i realise that i am in fact being reasonable, but he cant see it that way. can anyone else identify?and is this what i have ahead of me with my little girl? i know i prob wont have any answers for sure unless i actually get her diagnosed.. but i need some feedback first. she doesnt have any trouble making friends, in fact she's v charismatic... being almost two she doesnt yet understand the concept of sharing, which leads to tantrums and tears for her and her friends.. but thats normal at her age, isnt it?she's an only child at this stage, so her only practice with sharing comes from me, her dad and her little friends... being a girl too, and playing mostly with girls, who are all a bit more emotional, could it just be normal? she does tend to be a bit calmer with boys.. am i overreacting? and if she were to have asperger's, does that mean if we had another child one day, would it be at the same risk of developing it?please can someone help???
Post #54604
Posted 10/06/2011 8:26:49 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: Forum Members
Last Login: 10/07/2011 8:06:30 PM
Posts: 9, Visits: 4
I have taught children with Aspergers for a couple of decades now, and believe me when I tell you that you will know by pre school age whether this is the case for your little girl. 

As Aspergers Syndrome is part of the Austistic Spectrum Disorder there is an absolutely HUGE variation in behaviour patterns among children with this syndrome.  The best "test" for this is pure objective observation of behaviours.... with communication, social encounters, perhaps an obsession with specific things,  and most of all, the need for structured, predictable activities. 

Observe these areas closely, and if you are indeed concerned, then your GP is your first port of call. 

Post #57845
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

12»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse

All times are GMT +10:00, Time now is 2:27pm


Important! The content of these forums is not quality-assured by the Raising Children Network. Please help us maintain the quality of these forums by reporting any misuse to the administrator.