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Young Parents Expand / Collapse
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Posted 3/06/2006 10:55:33 PM
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My partner and I have a beautiful 2 year old boy who is the light of our lives. I am so proud to be his mother, yet I sometmes I find it hard to deal with the way some people look down on me because I was 18 when he was born. Sometimes I feel as though I should be ashamed to have a child. I've even had a person comment to me "that I only had a baby to get money from the government", even though I worked right through my pregnancy, am currently studying and working both part time, and help to run my partners business (he is the same age as me, 21). I know many people who have had children in there mid 20's and 30's and dont work and arent very good parents. I would like to hear from anyone else who is a young parent.
Post #1069
Posted 4/06/2006 10:39:31 AM


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I am not a young mum, but a friend of mine fell pregnant when she was 16 and it was unfortunately due to a horrible experience. Nevertheless, she was determined to raise her child as best she could. She had the worst time, moreso when she was pregnant, because people felt they had the right to just walk up to her in the street and tell her she was a slut or that she was pathetic and they didn't even know her circumstances! I was with her a few times when this happened and I used to get so mad, I would really go nuts at these people. I have never seen a better mother and I have asked her for advice several times since having my little one. I agree that there are some people probably taking advantage of the money, but I still don't think it gives anyone the right to be obnoxious. Keep up the good work with your child, sounds like you are a brilliant mum.

Post #1075
Posted 4/06/2006 5:50:13 PM
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Thank you for your reply. I'm very interested in hearing others views. I think that everyone can agree that parenting is really tough job, no matter what age you are.

p.s. Your bub looks absolutely gorgeous.

Post #1080
Posted 5/06/2006 11:22:37 AM
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It's a shame that people are so judgemental. There's nothing I hate more than others making assumptions about me based on a moment's glance, so I can relate to how you feel. And I commend you for working hard and being such an obviously good mother.

Isn't it funny that not so long ago it was the norm to have babies at a young age, and now if you do, you're considered morally inferior! Ridiculous, really. Women should have babies when they want to, so go for it.

Post #1109
Posted 5/06/2006 11:51:12 AM
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I totally agree with the previous posts, Mum was married at 17, had my sister at 21, me at 22. Regardless of what people thought mum and dad are still married. Grandma was 18 when she had mum. I consider myself lucky, my DS has a great-great grandfather, great-grandparents as well as grandparents, who can still chase him and his older cousins.

My sister had her DS#1 at 22 and doesn't regret it, in fact she loves it, ironically she was the youngest kindergarten mum at 28.

I say hold your head high, and be proud. It's a shame that society can be so brutal at times.

Naomi

Post #1110
Posted 6/06/2006 10:12:23 PM
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My mum had me when she was 20 (and out of wedlock - taboo in those days) and I felt I had a remarkable bond with her that grew as I got older. She was alot more with it than other parents i knew. I just hope that i can be like her with my boy even though I was 28 when i had him.

Do not worry about what others think. Your priority is raising your child to the best of your ability. Age does not necessarily bring with it the best knowledge and ability to raise a child.

Keep smiling

Post #1166
Posted 29/06/2006 7:25:02 PM
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I was 23 when my son was born, in wedlock! People were really shocked ! I was the youngest in the hospital by 12 years ( the midwives checked!) and the youngest in mothers group and playgroup too. It used to bother me, but then I just think "when I am 40, my son will be 17, and nearly off my hands, and I will get to do all the travel etc that I miss out on now. Not only that, but I bounced back from the birth quickly, and have lots of energy to play with him now.
Post #1631
Posted 3/07/2006 7:40:05 PM
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I think the same thing also. When I'm 40 my son will be 22, he will be an adult and I can take time for myself, instead of just starting to raise a family.

We hope to have another one soon before the age gap gets big between kids.

Post #1693
Posted 9/07/2006 12:37:38 PM
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hi there kristie lou, i know how you feel, espically when i go shopping by myself with bub, people look at me weird and because when my partner isn't with me they seem to think bad of me.  but it doesn't matter b'coz i'm a 20 year old proud mum of a sweet little 3 months daughter.  just looking at her everyday makes me feel that she fits into our pictures perfectly. no regrets.  so i'm stay at home mum while her dad works, sometime it can get a little boring but most of the time she keeps me sooo busy i didn't realise where time had gone. Any way good luck with your study n bub.
Post #1891
Posted 10/07/2006 8:04:18 AM
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HI butterfly*

I feel the same, when I am out with my partner people do tent to stare, but they dont when he is there.

I remember when Liam was a newborn. If you think  your bub is keeping yo busy now, wait till she starts crawling, then walking! omg, I think I am forever just walking behind my son cleaning up mess.

Post #1912
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