By Raising Children Network
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GP taking blood pressure of young girl with Down syndrome
 
The pathways to NDIS support are different for children of different ages, but the focus is the same – giving children quick access to the support they need. 

Children aged 0-6 years: pathway to NDIS support

To get support for your child aged 0-6 years under the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), you take the following path.

1. Contact the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA)
The NDIA runs the NDIS. You can call the NDIA on 1800 800 110, or you might be referred to the NDIA by your GP, child and family health nurse or paediatrician, or your child’s preschool or child care educator.

If your child currently gets government support like Better Start or Helping Children with Autism (HCWA), you’ll get a letter about the transition to the NDIS. 

2. Meet with an NDIS early childhood partner
An NDIS early childhood partner will arrange to meet with you to talk about your child’s and family’s needs.

3. Decide on your child’s support needs
You and your NDIS early childhood partner will work together to decide what supports your child and family need. This support might include:

  • information services, emotional support or referral to a mainstream service like a community health service
  • early intervention support and strategies
  • longer-term support and an individualised support plan. 

4. Develop an individualised plan if your child needs it
If your child needs longer-term, intensive support, your NDIS early childhood partner will work with you to draw up an individualised NDIS plan. This plan will cover the support your child needs.

Your NDIS early childhood partner will submit your child’s plan to the NDIA for approval.

5. Choose your early intervention support and service providers
When you’ve decided on what supports are best for your child and family, you can choose the NDIS providers you want to work with and start putting your child’s plan into action. 

Video NDIS pathways to early intervention

Download video   72.6mb
This video is about getting support under the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). Parents of children with disability talk about NDIS early childhood access partners and key workers, and how they got started with early intervention. It can start with a conversation, then your key worker can recommend ways to support your child’s development. The aim is to get young children into early intervention as quickly as possible, and for families to feel supported by the NDIS from the start.
 

Children aged over 7 years: pathway to NDIS support

To get support under the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), your child aged over seven years must have a permanent and significant disability or developmental delay that affects her ability to take part in everyday activities. 

1. Contact the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA)
The NDIA runs the NDIS. You can call the NDIA on 1800 800 110, or you might be referred to the NDIA by your GP or paediatrician.

If your child currently gets government support you might get a letter about the transition to the NDIS. 

2. Meet with an NDIA planner or NDIS local area coordination partner
An NDIA planner or an NDIS local area coordination partner will arrange to meet with you to talk about your child’s and family’s needs.

3. Develop an individualised plan based on your child’s needs
You and your NDIS professional will work together to complete an individualised NDIS plan. This plan will cover the support your child needs.

The NDIS professional will submit the plan to the NDIA for approval.

4. Choose providers
When your child’s plan is approved, you can choose the NDIS providers you want to work with and start putting the plan into action. 

The NDIS is being introduced gradually and will be available everywhere in Australia by 2019-20, except for Western Australia where trials will continue. Find out when the NDIS will be in your area.
 
 
 
  • Last updated or reviewed 08-06-2016
  • Acknowledgements This article was developed in collaboration with and funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.